Archive for the Boxing Category

Moving On

Posted in Boxing with tags , , , on June 11, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

A wise man once said “talk is cheap”.  In the case of David Haye, it’s not cheap; it’s worthless.

He promised to restore the glory of the heavyweight division.  He swore to clean up the murky championship picture by unifying titles.  His impressive run at cruiserweight, and being the  polar opposite of both Klitschko brothers, made him their most appealing challenger.

To his credit, he made heavyweight boxing remotely interesting.  Even if it was just for a brief moment.  Although for the third time within a calendar year, he sat on the brink of the most significant championship fight since 2003 only to remove himself from all negotiations to pursue an easier fight.

How is that going to bring back the lure of the heavyweights?  He would serve boxing much better if he would just disappear altogether.

It’s the new boxing tradition of talking your way to greatness but never actually backing it up.  Boxing is littered with fighters who do this but Haye has become it’s premiere practitioner.

David Haye is an absolute disgrace to boxing.  It’s time to move past Haye as he is not deserving of anyone’s time.  Manny Pacquiao is the most beloved boxer because his fists actually do his talking.  Haye is pumped up of false bravado and who has time to waste on his garbage?  There are better things to do.  Like basket weaving.

Boxing’s Baddest – P4P

Posted in Boxing with tags , , , on May 24, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

1) Floyd Mayweather


It kills me to place him atop and as I predicted he would cruise through the overrated Mosley bout, BUT its extremely fair to say that he will win against Manny Pacquiao when or if they meet.  He has benefited tremendously from matches against under-sized, bloated and declining opponents alike.

2) Manny Pacquiao


He’s a fight fan’s fighter and never disappoints. Though he’s too small and gets hit too often to think he can defeat Mayweather.

3) Sergio Martinez

Schooled Kelly Pavlik to win the middleweight title and was denied a decision I believed he deserved against Paul Williams.  On paper it was a loss, but in boxing, fighter’s loses aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on half the time.  Martinez was the better fighter in both cases and is on the verge of becoming a star.

4) Paul Williams


The crafty southpaw got away with a decision against Martinez then had his match against Kermit Cintron end in truly bizarre fashion.  He passed on a rematch with Cintron which is puzzling considering their match was just getting started when it abruptly ended.  The bottom line is he was absurdly awarded a win when no contest would be in order just about anywhere else on the planet.  He received another win he didn’t deserve and apparently that’s good enough for Paul Williams.  Then he wonders why nobody cares him.

5) Juan Manuel Marquez


Say what you will about Marquez fading but the fact he remains he has fought the best on his way up the scale.  Often against younger, fresher fighters.  That can’t be said about other fighters such as Mayweather and Chad Dawson.

A Heavy Load

Posted in Boxing, MMA with tags , , , , on April 27, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

Rumors are hard to keep in this day and age.  With the power of the internet at your fingertips, you can find out anything about anybody at any given time.

Even though Dana White has yet to confirm what we already know, it’s safe to say it maybe the most pivotal match in MMA history.

Randy Couture will present MMA at UFC 118 against former boxing champion James Toney.  Captain America vs the Detroit Motormouth.  The weight of an entire sport is resting firmly on the aging shoulders of Randy Couture.

Talk about pressure.

The seemingly endless debate of boxing vs. MMA will reach a conclusion in an intriguing battle between these over-the-hill stars.

Although I wish it were someone other than Randy Couture to get the call, but I have to say the fight makes sense.  Both guys are well past their primes and who better to test a boxer in the cage than the man who set the standard for modern-day grapplers?

Some skeptics will say that Toney is Dana White’s sacrificial lamb, but they obviously know nothing about James Toney.  He’s no slouch; not by any stretch of the imagination.

Although if you believe a traditionalist mixed martial artist, then Toney will be finished the moment he’s taken down.  James Toney has the best hands in the UFC. Hands down.  No one else in the promotion comes close.  If he lets his hands go, then it can be a nightmare for aspiring grapplers shooting for a take down.

That doesn’t bode well for Couture has been TKO’d in most of his losses.

Speaking of loses, Toney’s whiskers have never failed him.  Once he signed he immediately became the man with the best chin in the UFC stable.  Finishing him via strikes will prove to be most difficult.

Making Couture’s plight worse is that the entire sport of MMA is counting on him for the proverbial “I told you so”.  A loss suffered here will set back the sport for a long time.

Forget Sidney Crosby, Lance Armstrong and Tiger Woods.  Never before has a sport been so deeply hinged on a single performance by one of its athletes.  James Toney and boxing nothing to lose in this fight.  Both will be fine win or lose.  If Couture gets put to sleep then so does MMA.  It’ll go back to being regarded as a novelty act.

If that happens neither Couture nor MMA would want to awaken from that slumber.






Guaranteed Money

Posted in Boxing with tags , , , on April 13, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

Floyd Gayweather knows a thing or two about money.  He knows how to make it.  He knows how to throw it away.  He also knows how to stay money inside the ring.

Come May 1st, I will not be one of the many forking over $50 for Gayweather’s match against “Sugar” Shane Mosley.  There’s no need to when Gayweather’s victory is pretty much guaranteed.  Barring some freak occurrence, boxing’s biggest bitch will walk away with a decision win.

Two fights ago, Mosley stopped Ricardo Mayorga at 2:59 of the very last round.  Had the fight not been waved off, Mosley would have won by majority decision.  The encounter was a victory but it’s a prime example of Mosley’s masked declining ability.

It was a rare case where the finish depreciates a fighter.  Mayorga’s was everyone’s favorite come back victim because he could be easily outclassed by a technical boxer.  He was the perfect opponent for a fighter wanting to knock some rust off and look dominant in the process.  Mayorga should have never seen the championship rounds in that fight.  Oscar De La Hoya ran through him in 6; Tito Trinidad in 8.  There’s no excusing the fact Mayorga shouldn’t have survived as long as he did considering how overmatched he was against Mosley.

It’s hard to take away from a win much less two, but Mosley’s win against Antonio Margarito is another that deceived many.  Margarito can say he didn’t know about the illegal hand wraps, but every boxer knows how his hand wraps are done.

Judging by the look on his face and the way he fought, Margarito just wanted out of there.  He didn’t know what to do without the plaster wraps and he didn’t want to find out.  How else do you explain Margarito retreating, half the production of his normally furious pace, unwillingness to hunt down and walk through shots?  He fled and essentially gave up.  Mosley deserves credit for finishing him, but it’s another fruitless triumph due to the deflated version of Antonio Margarito that night.

There is almost nothing I would much rather see than to watch Gayweather lose, but unfortunately I will have to wait a little bit longer.  Mosley is one of the finest fighters of any generation but the sun is setting on his career.  It goes without saying Gayweather is well aware of this.  It’s why the fight was made in the first place.  The Mayorga and Margarito fights illustrated the bleak chance of an upset.

Shane Mosley doesn’t use his jab much anymore.  His rolling shoulders are gone.  His speed isn’t what it used to be.  He has his work cut out for him against the defensive mastery that Floyd Gayweather brings.  Mosley will land his shots but not enough of them to supplant Gayweather.

Mosley’s best chance is to turn it into a fight instead of a boxing match.  It’ll never happen against Gayweather.

Floyd Gayweather’s perfect record was no accident.  He’s reached his perch by following a carefully crafted and cunning plan.  He remains there by risking little and talking a lot.  Against Shane Mosley, Gayweather is out of harm’s way and will have plenty to brag about with Mosley’s name on his resume’.





The Magic of Manny

Posted in Boxing with tags , , , , on March 16, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

Motormouth Mayweather is unusually quiet these days.  Floyd Mayweather is running around his las Vegas mega mansion, that he can’t afford yet, trying to put a negative spin on Manny Pacquiao’s shut out win against Joshua Clottey.  Anyone who witnessed Clottey’s scared turtle impression last Saturday night against Manny Pacquiao realized what Mayweather did as he watched it himself.  There was no sensational KO this time around for Pacquiao, but the fact that Clottey bitched up and just tried to survive was a serious testament to Pacquiao as a fighter.  Just as much as the sounds of crickets coming from the Mayweather camp.  Pacquiao managed to clobber the pride out of Clottey, and shut up boxing’s biggest jerk all in one magical night.  It’s no wonder why he’s the best.

Rocky Clottey

Posted in Boxing with tags , , , on March 12, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

There’s a Manny Pacquiao fight this weekend and no one is really too excited about.  Maybe it’s because the fight is not viewed as much of a contest to begin with.  Winning the Pacquiao sweepstakes is welterweight standout, Joshua Clottey.  Going up against the pound-for-pound king of boxing, it’s not a question of if, but when will Pacquiao hand Clottey his first KO loss?

There is plenty of reason to back that assessment up.  After all Pacquiao has destroyed boxing’s best on his ascend to the top.  Clottey’s last fight was a decision loss to Miguel Cotto who was then butchered by Pacquiao last November.  So it is to no surprise that Clottey is an overwhelming underdog heading into Saturday’s match at Cowboys Stadium.

Clottey is viewed as having no real shot of winning the fight and the media have all but pegged him with the “Rocky” label.  Clottey is a tough and durable fighter. He doesn’t have much punching power and he’s fallen short in his biggest matches.  His trainer was not granted a visa out of his native land therefore had to be replaced for this fight.

Clottey has never been stopped before and is banking on his stubborn chin to defy the odds and reach the final bell.  Forcing a decision would be a moral victory for Clottey.  When facing the Filipino phenom, having Michael Buffer read the score cards instead of the final time, is the sweetest sound one can hear.  Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton and Miguel Cotto all failed to do so in Pacquiao’s last three matches.

This is the opportunity of a lifetime and Clottey will make the most of it.  He’s a game opponent and will put forth a tremendous effort.  He will come up short but I think it’s safe to say he’ll hear the final bell.  That will make him a winner in my book now matter how badly he’s beaten.




Pay The Man

Posted in Boxing, MMA with tags , , , , , , , on February 24, 2010 by Dallas O'Malley

The UFC’s story is quite touching. Going from nearly extinct a few years ago to currently the world’s #1 combat sport brand. Still don’t think so? Well UFC’s pay-per-view numbers for 2009 are astonishing. Of the top ten pay-per-view events of 2009, the UFC claimed six to boxing’s three. The UFC accumulated 6.13 millions pay-per-view buys on that list versus 3.125 million for boxing. When comparing boxing’s top 3 event totals to those of the UFC, Dana White smiles emphatically thanks to a distinct 2-1 victory over the age old sport, and not to mention their biggest competition. That is quite the success story. It’s the stuff Hollywood scripts are made of. Now when exactly do they plan on finally passing along their good fortune to their fighters?

Brock Lesnar headlined UFC100, the top PPV event of ’09, and received a $3 million payday once all was accounted for. It’s worthing nothing that a far less popular and disgraced boxer, Antonio Margarito, cashed in $2.3 million for fighting Shane Mosley on a regular broadcast of HBO’s Championship Boxing in January ’09. Boxing’s top draws can bank on $20 million when negotiating to fight each other, but the UFC can’t afford more than $3 million to its biggest cash cow for the most important show in the company’s history? WTF?

The UFC is raking in money hand over fist. Need more proof? UFC 100 sold 1.6 million PPVs. The monetary totals are undisclosed, but we can only estimate $320 million in UFC 100 purchases. That estimate was drawn from conservatively figuring the breakdown at 80% were home buys at $50 each, and 20% bar/extended outpost at $800 a piece. That’s a massive total already even without figuring in gate receipts and merchandising. It far exceeds HBO’s single broadcast budget. Lesnar’s pay wouldn’t even account for 1% of the pay-per-view revenues.

Boxing also has more payout obstacles. Bloated sanctioning fees from their governing bodies like the WBA, WBC and IBF often cripple the boxer’s purse. The UFC is free of that burden. Both boxing and the UFC hold events where this is no state tax. Both are also very profitable thanks to sponsors and confidential licensing fees.

There is no excuse for the anemic salaries awarded to UFC fighters. It is highway robbery when you consider a punk like Floyd Mayweather is making eight figures for his pitter-patter glorified sparring sessions on PPV. The UFC is a rock solid promotion amassed from the blood spilled by its fighters. Safe from any Affliction-type meltdowns in their future. What’s right is right and if the UFC is surpassing boxing’s numbers, then the fighter’s pay should be too or at least come close to it.